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Young Aviators Go Robotica

Young Aviators Go Robotica
They had the hip glasses and their monotonic robot voices down pat. The music was on and the robots had been hopping, lurching, drawing and chasing each other. Following months of devoted work, the kids in Laura Pink’s gifted science program at Antioch Elementary School were ready to sparkle for their peers from other schools.
Make that SPARK-le. As in, Student Pursuit Around Knowledge, the snappy fresh name for that Okaloosa County School District’s only program combining aeronautics and robotics.
“The kids are really proud of their new name,” Pink said. “We’re sparklers now!”
As for that sunglasses, “When you get glasses on, you are able to do anything,” Pink stated, adjusting her own pair of ornate silver-framed glasses.
Ever since the beginning of the college year, her fourth and fifth grade students have been studying robotics in conjunction with lessons in aviation taught by Leo Murphy, the Embry-Riddle Choice aviation program’s instructor at Choctawhatchee High School.
“We’re the only elementary school up here in a Choice program,” Pink stated.
Close to the room there had been robots nervously hopping close to a tray, rowing a Viking longboat, signing autographs, disco dancing, booting soccer balls, battling each other, and whizzing close to following a programmed route.
While most from the robots needed power sources, either from batteries or lights that activated solar cells, one still worked the old fashioned way. Zachary Fox exhibited a guitar-playing robot that needed a human hand to turn the crank at its base prior to it would strum its wooden guitar “They built this stuff,” Pink stated proudly, all of a sudden spinning close to as the cry “Runaway robot!” went up and everyone carefully watched where they put their feet until the rogue ‘bot was seized and taken back to its position.
The variety of actions the students’ robots performed and the difficulty of their development were amazing. When Gabriella Grois and Hannah Kelsey banged on the table or clapped their hands, a foot-tall wooden dinosaur lurched forward. A clap of Taylor Critcher’s hands and her “Moonwalker” started walking its way over the table—until it toppled over.
“That thing needs to be repaired,” intoned Daniel Bertling in his greatest robot voice.
After first building the machine, on one of the classroom computers, Daniel had programmed the robot that now whizzed close to and around in front of him.
“This is entirely made of Legos,” Daniel’s robot voice advised anyone who’d stop to watch.
“This is fun!” said Geoffrey Prestridge as he triggered one of the Viking longboats robotic oarsmen under a nearby work light. “Whew! It’s hot!” he then announced, yanking his arm out from under the light.
Even the most brilliant robotic engineers can get singed if they are not careful, Geoffrey learned.

They had the hip glasses and their monotonic robot voices down pat. The music was on and the robots had been hopping, lurching, drawing and chasing each other. Following months of devoted work, the kids in Laura Pink’s gifted science program at Antioch Elementary School were ready to sparkle for their peers from other schools.
Make that SPARK-le. As in, Student Pursuit Around Knowledge, the snappy fresh name for that Okaloosa County School District’s only program combining aeronautics and robotics.

“The kids are really proud of their new name,” Pink said. “We’re sparklers now!”
As for that sunglasses, “When you get glasses on, you are able to do anything,” Pink stated, adjusting her own pair of ornate silver-framed glasses.

Ever since the beginning of the college year, her fourth and fifth grade students have been studying robotics in conjunction with lessons in aviation taught by Leo Murphy, the Embry-Riddle Choice aviation program’s instructor at Choctawhatchee High School.

“We’re the only elementary school up here in a Choice program,” Pink stated.
Close to the room there had been robots nervously hopping close to a tray, rowing a Viking longboat, signing autographs, disco dancing, booting soccer balls, battling each other, and whizzing close to following a programmed route.

While most from the robots needed power sources, either from batteries or lights that activated solar cells, one still worked the old fashioned way. Zachary Fox exhibited a guitar-playing robot that needed a human hand to turn the crank at its base prior to it would strum its wooden guitar “They built this stuff,” Pink stated proudly, all of a sudden spinning close to as the cry “Runaway robot!” went up and everyone carefully watched where they put their feet until the rogue ‘bot was seized and taken back to its position.

The variety of actions the students’ robots performed and the difficulty of their development were amazing. When Gabriella Grois and Hannah Kelsey banged on the table or clapped their hands, a foot-tall wooden dinosaur lurched forward. A clap of Taylor Critcher’s hands and her “Moonwalker” started walking its way over the table—until it toppled over.

“That thing needs to be repaired,” intoned Daniel Bertling in his greatest robot voice.
After first building the machine, on one of the classroom computers, Daniel had programmed the robot that now whizzed close to and around in front of him.
“This is entirely made of Legos,” Daniel’s robot voice advised anyone who’d stop to watch.

“This is fun!” said Geoffrey Prestridge as he triggered one of the Viking longboats robotic oarsmen under a nearby work light. “Whew! It’s hot!” he then announced, yanking his arm out from under the light.

If you're interested in learning more about robotic kits and building one yourself start today by picking up a beginners robot kit here on Cool Robot Toys.

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