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Korea Building Robot Theme Park

The robot theme park in the Incheon Free Economic Zone is to be officially designated today as Robot Land improvement area by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy under the robotics development law, ministry officials said.The robot theme park, which the government says is the very first of its kind within the world, will feature numerous attractions for example entertainment facilities, exhibition halls, research and improvement centers, education buildings and industrial support facilities, officials said.

Robot Theme Park

The interactive web site for Robot Land already has artist renderings and info about the plans for the park. The website says the robot them park will consist of robot characters from movies and robot movie sets.

There will be a robot aquarium where visitors can watch and manipulate robot fish. Other features include a food court where individuals are served by robots, robot rides and a water park.

South Korea are building Robot Taekwon V. It is really a 364ft robot (twice the height of New York's Statue of Liberty) set to become the main attraction in the future Robot Land theme park.

Visit the Robot Land website to learn more!

LEGO


Service Robotics Worth $21 Billion By 2014

According to a new market study report published by MarketsandMarkets, a global market research and consulting organization, the total worldwide service robotics market is anticipated to be worth $21 billion by 2014, out of which the Asia market will account for nearly 35% from the total revenues. The worldwide market is anticipated to record a CAGR of 49.6% from 2009 to 2014.

Increasing ageing population concerns are driving the require for domestic and personal support robots. Efficient and advanced robots with lower power consumption are the need of the hour.

In individual service robotics marketplace, domestic robotics marketplace is the largest segment; and is expected to reach $1.97 billion by 2014 at a CAGR of 52%. The high market size of domestic robots is mainly due to demand of robots for assistance in household tasks and act as companion. The entertainment marketplace is estimated to become $1.85 billion in 2014. Defense, security and surveillance robots cover the large segment of the professional support robotics marketplace. Nevertheless, they're anticipated to become taken over by field robots by 2014.

Ageing population and continuous study has made Asia the dominant player in the service robotics marketplace. In 2009, the marketplace share is estimated to be 52% with a size of $3.7 billion. Europe is expected to have the second-highest marketplace for support robots. Nevertheless, large consumer base of domestic robots in the U.S. and Europe makes them the most attractive market for vacuum cleaners and other domestic items.

The Advanced material at MarketsandMarkets is pleased to announce its Analyst Briefing Presentation on the Worldwide Service Robotics marketplace to be held on June 8th.

Register @ http://www.marketsandmarkets.com


Robot Are Here To Stay

Robotic toys are a lot of fun and entertainment and they can be fantastic educational toys also. Robotic toys have been developed and refined quite a bit since Leonardo da Vinci's model, and the first robot toy was manufactured in 1939 when Westinghouse created Elektro, a human-like robot, and his robot dog companion Sparky. A smaller version, the Omnibot 2000, was a toy robot developed during the 1980's.

A company called WowWee created the most advanced human-like robotic toy hailed the Robosapien in 2004. Priced at under $99 (US), the first cost-effective, mass-produced humanoid sold four million units and gave life to the consumer robot industry.

The robot market has continued to grow at a very rapid pace. In the present day there is an increasing desire of buying and using robots whether it's a toy for our children, a security system or a lawn mower, adults and kids equally share in using them.

The Gaming Roboni-i

Robotic toys are fun to own, but they don't actually boast the same multi player functionality that video games presently have. That might all change with the The Gaming Roboni-i, Earth's first-ever programmable gaming robot.

It's simple to customize and is packed with games; play by yourself or against friends with like robots. You can even create your own games, or download games others have made. To set up a multi player game, the robots must link to each other in a group so that they can identify each other. When this occurs, you're able to intermingle with other The Gaming Roboni-i units and play games with them.

Robosapien

Robosapien is a highly developed mixture of personality with technology. Loaded with attitude and brains, Robosapien is the first robot based on the technology of applied biomorphic robotics. The Robosapien is capable of make out objects and even skin tones and recognize when its owner walks into the room. In addition, Robosapien also has internal incline sensors that can end most functions when he is located in unusual positions, such as lying on its back. The nice thing about this humanoid is the ability for him to stand up in instances where he tips over. Robosapien is a programmable, rapid moving robot. The Robosapien has real multi-speed rapid dynamic running, turning, and walking.

Robosapien has four programming modes: right sensor, left sensor, sonic and master program. The right and left sensors are triggered when sensors on their matching sides are triggered, the sonic sensor is activated when the robot hears a sharp noise (and is in the Listen mode), and the master program is triggered from the remote control.

Lego Mindstorms

Lego Mindstorms allows you to make and program robots that can do just about anything. LEGOLego Mindstorms give you the ability to put together your own robots and program them to carry out all kinds of actions. Version 1.0 RCX bricks feature a power adapter jack that allows nonstop operation rather than the narrow operation time when using batteries. In version 2.0 (as well as later 1.0s included in the RIS 1.5), the power adapter jack was taken off. Version 2.0 of the robotics invention kit includes a programming environment that puts a lot of professional programming products to shame. It is easy to understand why a lot of schools are standardizing on the mindstorms kits to teach classes in the field of robotics.

Wrex the Dog

Wrex the Dog's nose functions like a stop button when he is moving and a random activities selection button when he is not. Wrex the Dog is able to scoot about, play and follow commands and run like a real dog. He can turn his head, twitch his ears, pant and even wag his tail.

The First Robotic Arthropod Known As Roboquad

The First Robotic Arthropod Known As Roboquad is a four-legged, spider-like robot with unparalleled mobility and consciousness. The The First Robotic Arthropod Known As Roboquad is built with advanced sensory awareness, helping it respond immediately to the surrounding environment and follow a moving object in any direction, including forward, backwards, and sideways. The First Robotic Arthropod Known As Roboquad, by WowWee Robotics, claims the honor of being the first true robotic arthropod. It is fundamentally an animated robot that has multi-directional movement capabilities and highly developed sensory perception.

Roboquad even has an extended battery life for extended missions. Capable of spotting movement from up to 6 feet away with a IRscanner, he can also hunt for and navigate doorways, and distinguish table edges. When the lights go out, The First Robotic Arthropod Known As Roboquad can continue operating, turning on his head-mounted LEDs which lets it move in the dark. The First Robotic Arthropod Known As Roboquad becomes crabby, happy, attentive, standoffish and jumpy as he walks about on any type of floor. The First Robotic Arthropod Known As Roboquad can even dance.

Tread Based Roborover

Tread Based Roborover appears to be WowWee's 2009 successor to their massively popular Tri-Bot robot which appeared first in 2008. The primary difference is that Tread Based Roborover has treads rather than wheels.

Tread Based Roborover is enabled with object recognition. He has forward and rear sensors that prevent him from bumping in to walls. Tread Based Roborover's tread wheels let it maneuver over objects up to a 15-degree gradient, or about an inch high. Tread Based Roborover is an lively tread based friend with a timid but inquisitive nature, his personality grows and becomes more self-confident as you play with him. He is always eager to be on the move or play games with you. Tread Based Roborover has several distinct modes: explore, lookout, standby and sleep. Explore mode does just what you would expect; Tread Based Roborover navigates around the room autonomously while it avoids running into objects. Sensor-based LED headlights will automatically turn on if it's dark. The Tread Based Roborover features a mixture of vocal content and driving-based games.


The Roving Rovio Security Robot

The Roving Rovio Security Robot, allows you to be in two places at one time! WowWee The Roving Rovio Security Robot includes a WiFi connection which allows you drive it from anywhere in the world given that you have a web capable mobile phone or a PC with internet connection. The Roving Rovio Security Robot's built-in LED headlight will help you steer it even in faintly lit locations, so you will always know what is going on at home or at the office. Its skull-mounted, movable camera and wide range of vision allow you to see and hear precisely what The Roving Rovio Security Robot sees and hears, on your computer screen, anyplace in the world!

No need to be concerned about The Roving Rovio Security Robot running low on power while you're gone - the self-docking feature allows you to send The Roving Rovio Security Robot back to the charging dock to recharge, with the tap of a button in your internet browser. Once it's done charging, The Roving Rovio Security Robot is ready to continue watching your home or office.


Great Toy Robot Ideas For Birthday and Christmas

If you are looking for the ideal present for your children, grandchildren or even friends of the family then robot toys are an ideal choice. Robot Toys have come a long way over the last few years with the artificial intelligence becoming incredibly real as well as the moment of many of the toys available such as the Screature Interactive Dinosaur.

One of the latest robot toys, the Screature Interactive Dinosaur has a brilliant design which will please any child who receives this as a birthday or Christmas present. The scary look combines with extremely realistic sounds with the other end of the scale being a very loyal Dinosaur to his master. All you need to do is place him in a room on guard mode and he will guard your room with no hesitation or question.

If robot Dinosaurs are not your thing then the Matchbox Rocky the Robot Truck maybe more along your line of fun. This interactive dumper truck comes aimed at children from the age of three upwards. The truck has a superb array of features being able to talk, drive, lift, dump and do a dance. His vocabulary comes with over 100 phrases.

The Rocky The Robot is not just another toy on the market which will wear out quickly. The truck is built with strong durable plastic and able to handle heavy loads either by manually pulling the leaver or automatically when you make a noise. Adding to the 100 phrases Rocky has, press his red button and he will tell a joke or say a phrase or just wake him up if he is having an afternoon kip.

One of the best selling robot toys of 2009 was the incredible popular Zhu Zhu Pet Hamster. Kids just love them, with their curiosity and personality which ranges from abilities to play, slide, run and explore their home and environment. Each of the Zhu Zhu pets have their own personality, you may remember Furbys several years ago, these are very similar with their appreciation of being of being cared for, hear them chatter to themselves.

If your children are more into soft toys, animals or a combination of both then the Furreal Friends My Lovin Pup is a superb choice as a robot pet which comes with its adoption certificate which allows your new pup to complete its entry into his or her new home. The artificial intelligence of the Lovin Pup is very advanced with the pup being able to understand your voice.

Each of the Lovin Pups available come pretrained so they can sit, stay and stand right out of their box, or kennel should we say. As with real pet puppies, the Lovin Pup will bark or whine when a child speaks to them or bark with happiness when they hear their name called. All of these robot toys can be found on www.coolrobottoys.com with more information on each robot.

Rob Stone writes many articles on childrens toys from robots to trampolines all of which can be found online.


Enter Z-Man

Neglect ropes, ladders, and superpowers. Engineers at Draper Laboratory are working on a task for that military that could allow soldiers to imitate the wall-climbing ability of Spider-Man - and the glass-clinging strength of Gecko-Man, if only such a superhero existed.
Enter Z-Man, the progeny of the Cambridge laboratory and a federal agency born within the Cold War to maintain US military technology a step ahead of the Soviets.
The task is too sensitive to become talked about openly, but as well exciting to be kept a top secret. So the engineers developing it gave the public a peek at the technology at the Very first Robotics Competition, a competition of student-built, soccer-playing robots that drew thousands to Boston University Agganis Arena.
Beyond the mechanical goal-scoring, the colorfully outfitted undergraduate challengers, and also the boisterous cheering crowds of people, the Draper exhibit occupied a quiet corner from the concourse.
Set up around the bend from a pizza stand and beneath an action shot of former BU great Harry Agganis in his football uniform, the Z-Man engineers wowed passersby with two prototypes of the climbing technologies.
One imitates the microscopic bumps a gecko uses to adhere to smooth surfaces via a power recognized as the van der Waals interaction; the other uses rows of freely moving fish hooks to grab the minuscule nooks and crannies in concrete and bricks, not unlike the way a spider climbs.
Small barbell weights dangled from the hand-sized prototypes, one attached to glass, the other to a cement. The team from Draper, a Cambridge not for profit lab that largely conducts research and development for that government, was not permitted to say whether they had been successful in creating pads which will permit a soldier with combat load to scale a 25-foot wall in 15 seconds.
Those are the capabilities envisioned in the scant particulars concerning the project found in unclassified documents about the website of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which was created in 1958 after the surprise Soviet launch of Sputnik to keep the US military about the cutting edge of technologies.
Among the main sponsors from the Boston Regional Very first Robotics tournament, Draper decided to offer this uncommon peek into the Z-Man Program to excite the pupils in attendance with one of the coolest “out of all the crazy cool things that Draper does, said Ellen Avery, Draper’s community relations manager, speaking over the crashing robot sounds from the arena.
But being a semisecret defense project, the Z-Man display was consequently vague and limited. Carter spoke about the physics behind the technologies, being a colleague exhibited how very easily the prototypes attached and came off the vertical surfaces.
That at least proposed that peoples hands or feet can use the technologies to scale vertical surfaces the same way - if Draper pads can be modified to handle the weight of a human. And if they can, look out for Z-Man.

Neglect ropes, ladders, and superpowers. Engineers at Draper Laboratory are working on a task for that military that could allow soldiers to imitate the wall-climbing ability of Spider-Man - and the glass-clinging strength of Gecko-Man, if only such a superhero existed.

Enter Z-Man, the progeny of the Cambridge laboratory and a federal agency born within the Cold War to maintain US military technology a step ahead of the Soviets.

The task is too sensitive to become talked about openly, but as well exciting to be kept a top secret. So the engineers developing it gave the public a peek at the technology at the Very first Robotics Competition, a competition of student-built, soccer-playing robots that drew thousands to Boston University Agganis Arena.

Beyond the mechanical goal-scoring, the colorfully outfitted undergraduate challengers, and also the boisterous cheering crowds of people, the Draper exhibit occupied a quiet corner from the concourse.

Set up around the bend from a pizza stand and beneath an action shot of former BU great Harry Agganis in his football uniform, the Z-Man engineers wowed passersby with two prototypes of the climbing technologies.

One imitates the microscopic bumps a gecko uses to adhere to smooth surfaces via a power recognized as the van der Waals interaction; the other uses rows of freely moving fish hooks to grab the minuscule nooks and crannies in concrete and bricks, not unlike the way a spider climbs.

Small barbell weights dangled from the hand-sized prototypes, one attached to glass, the other to a cement. The team from Draper, a Cambridge not for profit lab that largely conducts research and development for that government, was not permitted to say whether they had been successful in creating pads which will permit a soldier with combat load to scale a 25-foot wall in 15 seconds.

Those are the capabilities envisioned in the scant particulars concerning the project found in unclassified documents about the website of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which was created in 1958 after the surprise Soviet launch of Sputnik to keep the US military about the cutting edge of technologies.

Among the main sponsors from the Boston Regional Very first Robotics tournament, Draper decided to offer this uncommon peek into the Z-Man Program to excite the pupils in attendance with one of the coolest “out of all the crazy cool things that Draper does, said Ellen Avery, Draper community relations manager, speaking over the crashing robot sounds from the arena.

But being a semisecret defense project, the Z-Man display was consequently vague and limited. Carter spoke about the physics behind the technologies, being a colleague exhibited how very easily the prototypes attached and came off the vertical surfaces.

That at least proposed that peoples hands or feet can use the technologies to scale vertical surfaces the same way - if Draper pads can be modified to handle the weight of a human. And if they can, look out for Z-Man.


Young Aviators Go Robotica

Young Aviators Go Robotica
They had the hip glasses and their monotonic robot voices down pat. The music was on and the robots had been hopping, lurching, drawing and chasing each other. Following months of devoted work, the kids in Laura Pink’s gifted science program at Antioch Elementary School were ready to sparkle for their peers from other schools.
Make that SPARK-le. As in, Student Pursuit Around Knowledge, the snappy fresh name for that Okaloosa County School District’s only program combining aeronautics and robotics.
“The kids are really proud of their new name,” Pink said. “We’re sparklers now!”
As for that sunglasses, “When you get glasses on, you are able to do anything,” Pink stated, adjusting her own pair of ornate silver-framed glasses.
Ever since the beginning of the college year, her fourth and fifth grade students have been studying robotics in conjunction with lessons in aviation taught by Leo Murphy, the Embry-Riddle Choice aviation program’s instructor at Choctawhatchee High School.
“We’re the only elementary school up here in a Choice program,” Pink stated.
Close to the room there had been robots nervously hopping close to a tray, rowing a Viking longboat, signing autographs, disco dancing, booting soccer balls, battling each other, and whizzing close to following a programmed route.
While most from the robots needed power sources, either from batteries or lights that activated solar cells, one still worked the old fashioned way. Zachary Fox exhibited a guitar-playing robot that needed a human hand to turn the crank at its base prior to it would strum its wooden guitar “They built this stuff,” Pink stated proudly, all of a sudden spinning close to as the cry “Runaway robot!” went up and everyone carefully watched where they put their feet until the rogue ‘bot was seized and taken back to its position.
The variety of actions the students’ robots performed and the difficulty of their development were amazing. When Gabriella Grois and Hannah Kelsey banged on the table or clapped their hands, a foot-tall wooden dinosaur lurched forward. A clap of Taylor Critcher’s hands and her “Moonwalker” started walking its way over the table—until it toppled over.
“That thing needs to be repaired,” intoned Daniel Bertling in his greatest robot voice.
After first building the machine, on one of the classroom computers, Daniel had programmed the robot that now whizzed close to and around in front of him.
“This is entirely made of Legos,” Daniel’s robot voice advised anyone who’d stop to watch.
“This is fun!” said Geoffrey Prestridge as he triggered one of the Viking longboats robotic oarsmen under a nearby work light. “Whew! It’s hot!” he then announced, yanking his arm out from under the light.
Even the most brilliant robotic engineers can get singed if they are not careful, Geoffrey learned.

They had the hip glasses and their monotonic robot voices down pat. The music was on and the robots had been hopping, lurching, drawing and chasing each other. Following months of devoted work, the kids in Laura Pink’s gifted science program at Antioch Elementary School were ready to sparkle for their peers from other schools.
Make that SPARK-le. As in, Student Pursuit Around Knowledge, the snappy fresh name for that Okaloosa County School District’s only program combining aeronautics and robotics.

“The kids are really proud of their new name,” Pink said. “We’re sparklers now!”
As for that sunglasses, “When you get glasses on, you are able to do anything,” Pink stated, adjusting her own pair of ornate silver-framed glasses.

Ever since the beginning of the college year, her fourth and fifth grade students have been studying robotics in conjunction with lessons in aviation taught by Leo Murphy, the Embry-Riddle Choice aviation program’s instructor at Choctawhatchee High School.

“We’re the only elementary school up here in a Choice program,” Pink stated.
Close to the room there had been robots nervously hopping close to a tray, rowing a Viking longboat, signing autographs, disco dancing, booting soccer balls, battling each other, and whizzing close to following a programmed route.

While most from the robots needed power sources, either from batteries or lights that activated solar cells, one still worked the old fashioned way. Zachary Fox exhibited a guitar-playing robot that needed a human hand to turn the crank at its base prior to it would strum its wooden guitar “They built this stuff,” Pink stated proudly, all of a sudden spinning close to as the cry “Runaway robot!” went up and everyone carefully watched where they put their feet until the rogue ‘bot was seized and taken back to its position.

The variety of actions the students’ robots performed and the difficulty of their development were amazing. When Gabriella Grois and Hannah Kelsey banged on the table or clapped their hands, a foot-tall wooden dinosaur lurched forward. A clap of Taylor Critcher’s hands and her “Moonwalker” started walking its way over the table—until it toppled over.

“That thing needs to be repaired,” intoned Daniel Bertling in his greatest robot voice.
After first building the machine, on one of the classroom computers, Daniel had programmed the robot that now whizzed close to and around in front of him.
“This is entirely made of Legos,” Daniel’s robot voice advised anyone who’d stop to watch.

“This is fun!” said Geoffrey Prestridge as he triggered one of the Viking longboats robotic oarsmen under a nearby work light. “Whew! It’s hot!” he then announced, yanking his arm out from under the light.

If you're interested in learning more about robotic kits and building one yourself start today by picking up a beginners robot kit here on Cool Robot Toys.